OFFSHORE FISHING

Offshore Fishing What We Catch

Deep Sea Fishing If you have never been on an offshore fishing charter, then make it a point to get to Louisiana for the best fishing experience in the Gulf of Mexico. If you are not an expert, then your captain, like Captain Troy, may teach you to use a variety of fishing techniques including trolling, jigging, bottom-fishing, popping and drifting depending on what species of fish you want to catch, the weather and many other factors. Here are some of the species of fish that you may catch when you go deep-sea fishing in the waters off the Louisiana coast.   Blue Marlin   Blue marlins are large fish that live in medium-depth waters that are nutrient-rich off the Louisiana coast. These fish have an elongated upper jaw forming a spear shape, and watching one break through the water’s surface can be the thrill of a lifetime. This is especially true if he is on the end of your 50-to-80-pound fishing line. Catching blue marlins, however, is never easy as they are one of the biggest fighters to live in the Gulf of Mexico, but when you do, their pointed dorsal fin makes them an impressive looking fish to look at. They often travel in schools, so your captain may be able to spot a school and position your boat to give you the best opportunity of catching one. Most anglers have the best luck catching blue marlin by dragging artificial fishing lures behind the boat. It may, however, be possible to catch blue marlin while drifting. The state record blue marlin weighed 1,018.5 pounds, and it was caught by Linda Koerner in 1977. This fish was also the first fish caught in the Gulf of Mexico weighing more than 1,000 pounds.   Tuna   Several different species can be caught when tuna fishing off the coast of Louisiana. One of them is the bigeye tuna. This species that is a metallic blue on their top and white on their underside usually lives in water deeper than 1,000 feet. They tend to do most of their feeding at night making catching one a little tricker. They are usually caught while trolling in areas where blue marlins are abundant. The state record bigeye tuna weighing 197.25 pounds was caught by George Graham in 2009. Another species that is often caught is the bluefin tuna. The bluefin tuna often live in large schools, and they tend to constantly be moving. Ron Roland caught the state record bluefin tuna weighing 1,152 pounds in 2003. Giant bluefin tuna are often longer than 100 inches in length and have a girth of more than 86 inches. You will know that you have done battle with a worthy specimen when it takes more than an hour to battle these fish into the boat.   Wahoo   Wahoo fish often live around the oil platforms, and you usually need to travel at least 15 miles offshore to catch them. These fish often live near where the…