A Guide to the Top Big Game Fish Found in Louisiana

Louisiana’s Guide to the Top Big Game Fish   The legendary quality of Louisiana offshore fishing has made it of the state’s premier attractions. If you are searching for the best quality big game fish, you will find them right here in the Pelican State. Whether you’re interested in local Gulf charter fishing or in serious Gulf deep sea fishing, you’re bound to find top notch conditions for your favorite offshore activity.   No matter what kind of big game fish you may be interested in, you’re sure to find some of the finest examples in the world. Here’s a quick rundown of some of the most famous big game species to be discovered in the realm of Louisiana offshore fishing.   Yellowfin Tuna   Louisiana has long been known as one of the premier spots for Gulf Coast deep sea fishing. If you’re ready to reel in one of the state’s best known and loved specimens, it’s time to set your sights on the Yellowfin tuna. There is no seasonal limit on finding the mighty Yellowfin tuna. It can be caught all year round, even in the deep winter season.   If you really want to find the Yellowfin in all of its natural abundance, you’ve got to try the Midnight Lump. This is the name given to a large salt dome also known as the Sackett Bank. The Lump can be found roughly 50 miles off the Venice coast. It can also be accessed about 21 miles away from where the mouth of the Mississippi River is found. If you’ve never fished the Midnight Lump before, you’re in for a major treat.   Blue Marlin   Planning on reeling in the mighty Blue Marlin? Get ready for the fight of your life. This heavyweight champion is one of the major highlights of the Louisiana Gulf fishing scene. When your Marlin breaks the water upon being hooked, you’d best be prepared for a lot of nervous nail biting and heavy duty line wrangling.   Unlike the Yellowfin, the Marlin is very much a seasonal visitor. If you want to get hooked on the thrill of the chase, you need to be in Louisiana during the late spring and mid-summer, roughly May through July.   Finding the Marlin is a true Gulf deep sea fishing odyssey. You won’t find them in the shallows. They prefer to congregate in major numbers some 15 to 100 miles off the coast. Once you’re in their territory, you can spot the Blue Marlin on the surface of the water surface. Look for them in the vicinity of Port Fourchon, Grand Isle and Venice.   Louisiana Swordfish   One of the acknowledged main prizes of Louisiana fishing is the legendary Swordfish. This classic deep sea creature is one of the fiercest and tastiest morsels known to anglers all over the southern United States. But if you want to find the choicest catch, you’ve got to come to Louisiana.   The Swordfish is a close relative…

Tips and Tricks for Tuna Fishing in Louisiana Gulf Coast Waters

Tips and Tricks for Tuna Fishing in Louisiana Gulf Coast Waters

Tips and Tricks for Tuna Fishing Tuna fishing in any water can be quite an experience, but fishing with Captain Troy Wetzel is a once in a lifetime experience. Yellowfin Tuna in the Gulf can reach record sizes and if your fishing with Captain Troy he is sure to provide visitors a thrill that will last forever. Your local charter boat fishing Louisiana captain uses decades of experience to get you to where these fish are in abundance, and has a few secrets up their sleeves for finding those monsters. Here are some tips and tricks for tuna fishing in the gulf coast waters of Louisiana that will help you land that storytelling monster tuna.   Tuna Fishing Near the Oil Rigs One of the best kept secrets in the south is the amazing tuna fishing that can be found near the many oils rigs off the coast of Louisiana. There are numerous rigs dotting the horizon of the Gulf, and local fishermen have been spoiled for years. They bring their fishing boats as close as possible and that is where they find the gulf coast monster tuna. Now it isn’t just about cruising the rigs to find tuna, it also about having the right bait fish, fishing at the right time of year, and the weather and water conditions. A good charter boat captain will know that you have to pay close attention the surface waters as you approach the rigs. The Yellowfin tuna are well known to hang around the up-current on the side of the oilrig. He will also check the waters around the rig for sub-currents. The larger of the tuna will move around in different currents, despite what you are seeing on the surface. An experienced charter boat captain can read the waters and will know where the tuna are waiting to be caught.Ff   Finding Big Tuna in Deep Water The deeper the water you are fishing, the bigger the tuna you are catching. It is very important that you are paying close attention to your depth sounder, marking locations beneath the boat to make sure that your lures are down at the correct depth. The reason being is that the larger tuna are less afraid down that deep, and more likely to take a stab at your bait if you can find them. Make certain that you get a good feel for the weight of the tuna on your line. If you don’t and set the hook, it is going to be gone in the blink of an eye.   Chumming the Deeper Waters One of the more productive ways to attract the tuna near the boat is to chum the waters. Not only will the tuna come closer to the surface, they will arrive in record numbers too. Once they reach the chum, the action could be fierce as they fight each other for a free meal. One of the tricks for attracting the big tuna after chumming the water is to…

Venice, Louisiana Fishing After Storm Season 2017

Charter Fishing Comes Back Strong Dealing with Hurricanes and Tropical storms is part of living here in South Louisiana. We know that there is a give and take to being able to say we live in the “Sportsman’s Paradise”.  In August of 2017, the forecast for the Atlantic Basin was to expect above-average named storms to make landfall along the gulf coast. Our neighbors to our left and right, took the worst of the landfalls this season, not leaving South Louisiana untouched. Venice, Louisiana Fishing After Storm Season 2017 shows fishing charters are staying booked. Venice, Louisiana Fishing After Storm Season 2017 Finally, the end of November marks the end of Hurricane Season.  Venice, LA Charter Fishing Captains are sending in good reports.  Have no worries when choosing Venice fishing charter destinations, our camps and lodges are open and in good repair. Many Charter Fleets in Venice, LA have had their boats updated and are ready to take advantage of the post storm aggressive “bite” off shore. Fall and winter fishing in Venice, LA is probably one of the hottest seasons all year, let alone coming off an active tropical season like we just experienced.  A tropical event, typically turns the heat up on the fishing in Venice, LA.  Local guides in Venice will tell you that the fish can feel the barometric pressure dropping through their swim bladders before the storm.  They realize when the danger has passed over and it is safe to return. Venice, Louisiana Fishing After Storm Season 2017 & BIG Tuna Off shore fishing following a tropical storm or hurricane, is prime from the time the barometric pressure begins to drop, until it bottoms out.  The days following a tropical weather event, the deeper water species of fish; such as the Grouper and Snapper, return hungry.  BIG Yellowfin Tuna will always return as the storm heads out, sending anglers scrambling to get a piece of the action. Trash or Treasure As much as we hate cleaning up our camps & waterways after the storm season, the debris left floating in gulf after a storm adds to the aggressiveness of the bite. If you can get on both the tail end of the storm, and find some debris to fish, the bait won’t drop down out of eyesight before the excitement begins.  Does the answer lay in the baitfish taking shelter under the debris, or the larger fish looking to see if the storm debris is edible?  Since the only thing we can count on is the bite, we won’t bother to ask why. Fishing the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico can be dangerous without a severe weather threat, so never risk your safety to test the timing of the bite during a storm. When the Venice, LA tropics cool down, the fishing heats up but knowing that tropical weather can linger on into December is important. Our professional fishing guides here in Venice will keep an eye on the weather, knowing that safety…

Huge fish caught charter fishing

Charter Fishing for Yellowfin Tuna Out of Venice LA

Charter Fishing For Yellowfin Tuna Charter fishing continues to soar in popularity across the Gulf Coast region. In fact, deep sea fishing is a great way to enjoy the open waters with friends and loved ones. One of the more popular charter fishing tours is in the Gulf of Mexico for Yellowfin tuna. So many corporate charters have been booked for these exciting and fun-filled fishing trips. Similarly, many families are trekking to the Gulf to fish for tuna, trout and other deep-sea fish. With this in mind, charter fishing out of Venice LA has some of the best offshore fishing around. Just a stone’s throw from New Orleans, many people actually leave the Big Easy to come to Venice for deep sea fishing expeditions. If you love charter fishing – there is nothing like Venice LA fishing for your friends, loved ones and co-workers. The Benefits of Venice Charter Fishing New Orleans charter fishing is a great way to spend quality time with loved ones and friends. However, Venice LA is the place to be for charter fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. With years of extensive industry experience, there are several charter fishing companies out of Venice. These experts specialize in deep sea fishing for all private and corporate charters. From large vessels and elegant cutters to lavish yachts – these companies also feature a full fleet of boats for all charter fishing trips. Best of all, they provide passengers with fishing rods, tackle, bait and especially safety gear and apparel. As always, passengers can bring their own fishing equipment and lunch /snacks as well. Charter fishing is designed to take fishing enthusiasts out to sea. In fact, shoreline or shallow fishing is not as fun as deep sea fishing in the Gulf. Charter companies even teach tips for catching  Yellowfin tuna, as well as other varieties of trophy fish. This includes using the right bait, as well as reeling large and smaller fish. Yellowfin tuna -like other fish – are pretty fast and swift in the water. They are mainly found in warmer waters, which make the Gulf of Mexico ideal to fish for them. If you love deep sea fishing and want to get away for a weekend, charter fishing is the best way to relax and have a great time as well. Why Venice Louisiana for Fishing? Venice has – and continues to – be the premier place for charter fishing in Louisiana. From deep sea tuna to trout fishing, Venice Harbor Boat Drive is blanketed by several charter fishing companies and contractors. The best of these charter fishing captains also feature fishing lodges and hospitality venues – such as Captain Troy. This means you can enjoy a weekend of charter fishing – without having to leave Venice for hotels and motels. It is important to contact local venues to check on availability of rooms and charter fishing boats. Most people love to fish for Yellowfin tuna during the spring and summer months. However, early fall…

women fishing

Women Fishing

Women Fishing   On any given day now in the South Louisiana waters, you will not only see women fishing with their significant others, but launching their own boats.  Gone are the days of men keeping the joys of fishing all to themselves, and somewhere, along the way us women “caught” on.   Fishing was shared with me as a young child.  My brother would take me out fishing winter, spring, summer & fall.  And ladies, when your older brother is teaching you to fish, you best bet you will be able to tie on your tackle, bait your hook, reel it in, and put that fish in the ice chest.   Respect Is Earned After meeting my now husband, it was not more than an hour into the first date that I asked the obvious question, the one that would determine if there would even be a second date, “do you fish?”.   Let’s just say, he gave the right answer and we said, “I do” on the shore of the blue gulf waters.  I quickly became his favorite fishing partner. Today, my husband will tell anyone that will listen he would rather fish with me any day than a grouchy old man.  I did have to prove myself worthy though right from the start.  See ladies, respect on the water, is earned.  It is in no way cute to a serious angler to have a lady on the boat who needs everything done for her. Show a man you can not only handle yourself, but be some help to him with the boat, bait & catch, and trust me, he will be bragging to all his friends in no time.   Times A Changin’ I know most of my female friend’s fish also.  You know how the saying goes, “birds of a feather, flock together”. I wanted to see if the cast net of female anglers was even larger than I had thought.  I also have noticed that us fishing chicks are doing more at the launch, and with the boat.  So yesterday, I decided to interview a few of the ladies through Social Media, to see if my hunch was right.   I decided my research would begin with asking the ladies out there, six simple questions: Do you prefer freshwater or saltwater fishing?   Are you capable of pulling, trailering & operating a boat?   If so, what size boat do you run? Do you tie on your own tack, bait your hook, and remove your fish? Do you clean the days catch? I even asked the ladies about their wardrobe.  You know we are flooded with young hot chicks in bikinis fishing all over the internet, but, we choose what we wear just same as the men do, how dang hot or cold it is that day?   My inbox began to ding immediately, I knew these ladies were just waiting to be asked.   Gals as young as teens sharing fish tales of fishing beside their…

fishing in the gulf of mexico

Navigating Natures Fish Finder

Three Gifts of Guidance Devoted anglers and Charter Fishing Captains heading out of Venice, Louisiana know that there is more to catching their daily limit, then the size of their “Fish Finder”.   Charter Fishing Captains & Crew will avoid the areas where the vast amounts of boats will cluster up and rely on an age-old technique; nature as their guide. Nature has always and will always, provide the best three approaches to fishing the Gulf of Mexico. The experienced angler knows that success in landing those fat Speckled Trout, is knowing what to look for. Along with weather, water temperature and tide, Venice, LA Charter Captains keep their eyes, ears and nose open. That Sheen & What it Means Often, the surface of the water in the Gulf of Mexico is covered in areas, with an oily “sheen” .  During the warm summer months, they are easy to spot on an inshore or offshore fishing trip. Mid-Summer Charters leaving the Venice Marina can expect the warm coastal waters to be chock full of bait fish. These bait fish bring the predator fish, like the highly coveted Speckled Trout.  The nutrient dense environment provides a colossal grouping of shrimp, Croaker, mullet, and menhaden. The Speckled Trout just cannot resist and as they ravish these bait fish, they regurgitate their meal. This “sheen” is the result of the regurgitation.  Often confused with an oil spill, or an adverse environmental occurrence, by the unknowing angler, it is quite the opposite.  Often referred to as a “feeding slick”, this “sheen” is anything but adverse.  It is a welcome sight when chasing those Fat Speck’s. Hey, You Smell That? Have you ever smelled a faint scent of watermelon while on a guided fishing trip in the Gulf of Mexico?  The “sheen” that is produced by the regurgitation of the fish will have a slight watermelon scent. Often that be the first sign of a “feeding slick” ahead.  A welcome scent when Venice Fishing Charters are out hunting the perfect spot for their clients to experience the best that Louisiana fishing has to offer. The watermelon scent in the air, accompanied with the sheen of a feeding slick, is a sure bet those Fat Specks are just a cast away from becoming dinner.  When you hit one of these spots, the Specks will hit aggressively.  These conditions will support just about any plastic you toss their way. That “Other” Sheen That Can Be Seen A “current slick” is another one of the tricks the ole Salty Anglers rely on.  Beneath the surface of the shallow bays and passes in the waters of South Louisiana, lies a grid of deeper channels that have been carved out over time. The bait fish will cluster up there in the slower moving current and become “lazy” of sorts. This makes them easy prey for Specks to feed on. Current Slicks, like Feeding Slicks jump around.  Spot the slick, anchor outside and cast right into the middle.  The Specks will be there,…

shark fishing in venice

Shark Week Spurs Interest In Venice For Shark Fishing

    That “Shark Week is Over” Feeling Shark lovers and haters alike have finally emerged from their homes as the 2017 Shark Week on Discovery Channel has sadly, come to the end.  They teased us with Episode 1 “Sharktacular 2017” on July 07, 2017, forty-one minutes of television utopia.  One more tease a week later, then  July 23, 2017  began the week of various excuses for missed social events, shark tales around the water cooler, and more than enough Shark Memes to go around.  Social Media was all a buzz.   This year, love him or hate him, Olympic Gold Medalist, Michael Phelps tested his speed against a great white.  It is not a surprise that many viewers were pulling for the shark! (Just kidding Mikey).  No matter the emptiness that we are left with until next year, 2017 Shark Week is really over and  many of us loyal “fin-fan’s” have to find a way to cope with the loss.   Better Than Tuning In, Could It Be? Venice, Louisiana Charter Fishing offers an up close & personal experience for the “shark curious” around the globe.  This time of year, coincidentally following the end of Shark Week, Charter Fishing Captains in and around Venice, LA, see an uptick in Charter requests for Shark Fishing Trips, and they are eager to oblige.  Not only are shark sightings a sure bet, but reeling in the various shark species found in the warm gulf waters of South Louisiana is the best “Shark Week” detox you can get for your money.  Now, you cannot take a bite out of Michael Phelps, and the odds are you won’t be reeling in any Great Whites, but you will be sure to hook into a few of South Louisiana’s coastal celebrities.       Inshore Satisfaction Louisiana waters are home to many species of sharks, yes, several of the sharks you viewed from your easy chair are just a Charter Booking away from up close & personal.  Louisiana’s lakes and bays are an important nursery ground for sharks. These are the vital areas where female sharks bear their young.   If the emptiness from this year’s Shark Week finale has left you without a willingness for long excursions, no fear, Louisiana’s inshore waters are possibly just the right fix to get you through.  Venice Fishing Charter Captains know where to find the most common inshore, coastal species of sharks.     Sharks, Sharks and More Sharks Bull sharks, black tips, spinners and hammerheads are abundant in the warm gulf waters’.  The Inshore Charters that leave out of Venice, LA offer anglers an exciting fishing trip without having to travel too far out, and no sightings of Michael Phelps to date.   The Bull Shark is just probably the ugliest of all sharks (if a shark can be ugly), ranging from 100-200 pounds and it has a prominent, blunt nose making it easily distinguishable.  Known to even swim into fresh water, locals swim with caution. The Black Tip Shark average 5-20 pounds…

Louisiana fishing charters

Charter Fishing In the Gulf of Mexico for Yellowfin Tuna

Charter Fishing In the Gulf Whether you are an experienced angler or are just learning this great hobby there is no better place to indulge yourself than launching out of  Venice, LA to fish in the Gulf of Mexico. Venice has consistently come first as the best place for offshore fishing for a variety of fish. There are many types of fish that you can catch in the Gulf- amberjack, cobia, snapper, tarpon, triple tail and tile fish are just but a few. Yellowfin tuna, however, is one of the most common reasons that bring people out here. The Mighty Yellowfin Tuna Yellowfin tuna are big fish. If one of the items on your bucket list is to catch a monster fish –  Yellowfin is definitely a way your dreams will come true. These fish usually weigh between 40 and 60 pounds, but because these waters are so rich in nutrition it is not uncommon for anglers to catch Yellowfin that is as large as 180 pounds. You can take your catch home for your family to enjoy or even sell it to a local restaurant – it is what is known as ahi or maguro at your local sushi restaurant. You don’t have to travel very far to catch them – your fishing charter will take you about 50 miles offshore you will find schools of them swimming there, but if you want an even bigger catch you can travel about 75 miles offshore because this is where the real winners are to be found. Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico Anglers travel to these waters in the Gulf of Mexico on fishing charters boats. These are boats that are available for hire for as many days as you like. They come in different sizes and the one that you choose will be determined by the size of your group. These charter boats are ready for a large group – whether that be the family, friends or co-workers. The waters in the Gulf of Mexico are generally calm because weather is good year round, but it is advisable to go with a captain just in case you run into any problems. That doesn’t mean that you don’t need to pay attention to the weather – it can get dangerous is you are not with the right charter fishing captain. Venice Fishing Although Yellowfin Tuna are seasonal, you can go fishing in Venice LA year round – unlike many other fishing spots around the country where you have to wait for the warm months to enjoy angling, the great weather in this area means that you can go there several times a year. In the winter you will find schools of Yellowfin tuna at a spot called Midnight Lump, but in the summer they are found all over the Gulf of Mexico. People love to angle for Yellowfin tuna not just because of their size but also because they present a unique challenge. These fish are big but they are…

identifying Louisiana yellowfin tuna

Identifying the Yellowfin Tuna

Catching Yellowfin Tuna Yellowfin tuna are well known for their physical beauty and powerful swimming, however, the similar appearance across the different varieties of tunas can lead to some confusion over identification. The bluefin, albacore, yellowfin, and bigeye tuna are all football shaped and have a streamline body with shimmers of silver on their sides and darker colorations by their dorsal. The yellowfin has a dark blue dorsal surface while it can appear brownish in the water. True to their name, the yellowfin tuna have yellow in their fins and a shiny, golden yellow along their sides but coloration alone won’t allow you to correctly identify the different species of tuna. A key feature to identify a yellowfin tuna is the length of their pectoral fins. Each species has a particular “design” to their pectoral fins that identifies them: The yellowfin’s pectoral fin reaches the beginning of their second dorsal fin while the albacore pectoral fin always goes beyond the start of the second dorsal and the bluefin pectoral fin never reaches the second dorsal fin. The combination of color and pectoral fin size should give you a clear identification in most cases. Size of the Yellowfin Yellowfin tuna grow faster than the bluefin tuna, but do not reach the large size of their giant cousin. The largest yellowfin tuna on record was 388 lbs. And was caught in Mexico in 1977. The growing cycle for a yellowfin tuna 8-10 pounds at one year, age 2 about 35 lbs. and at 3 years old about 75 pounds. By 4 years old a yellowfin will averages about 130 lbs and can on average get as large as 200 lbs.   Angling and Handling Tips   Yellowfin tuna are one of the most challenging species to catch with a rod and reel. Their large size and high capacity for exercise can result in broken tackle if you are poorly prepared. Trolling and chumming are the primary methods used by anglers, but there are many tips for catching Yellowfin Tuna.  Trolling involves creating a flashy presentation of multiple lures trolled in the boat wake while moving along at 7-8 nautical miles per hour. Single hook lures with plastic skirts are a common offering and chains or spreader bars of lures are an option to increase the visual attraction. Green is a popular color for yellowfin tuna. The idea is to have a pattern of lures that splash, wiggle and sparkle enough to trick the fish into thinking it is attacking a group of agitated baitfish. Chumming involves introducing a baited hook to yellowfin tuna while the boat is drifting or anchored. Cut pieces of common bait fish are tossed in the water around the baited hook to attract tuna. Tackle Needed   Both methods use similar fishing tackle. Yellowfin typically range between 30-80 pounds, so use high quality 30, 50, or 80 pound-class reels, rods and line to fish for these beauties. Yellowfin that exceed 100 pounds are matched well with the 80…